Home Entertainment Reggae star, Ras Kimono dies at 60 after ‘chest pains’ complaint

Reggae star, Ras Kimono dies at 60 after ‘chest pains’ complaint

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Reggae star, Ukeleke Onwubya, popularly known as Ras Kimono, is dead following a brief illness.

He died at Lagoon Hospital in Ikoyi. Before his death, he had planned a medical trip to the US on Saturday night. He was reported to have complained of chest pains.

Sir Shina Peters and other members of the Copyright Society of Nigeria (COSON) have confirmed the death.

An advocate of social change, Kimono was known for his patois styled music. In 1989, he and his band group, Massive Dread Reggae Band, released an album titled Under Pressure. He once revealed that he is a vegetarian and has never indulged in any affair that went against his upbringing including smoking and drinking.

Adter a five year hiatus, Kimono last year dropped a new single titled; “Blessed Africa”. It was released digitally by his former record label, Premier Records Limited.

He said the song was a reflection of what Nigeria and Africa at large have been going through despite the rich mineral, human and natural resources in the land.

The album didn’t have much impact. He, however, says it was because they weren’t accompanied with music videos. “I plan to shoot videos this year. Though people think CDs don’t sell again, I belong to the school of thought that believes that CDs must sell. The Internet is still not available to everyone in the country, especially for people in the North. Many people in the rural areas still prefer buying CDs,” he said.

Speaking about his unwillingness to change his music to appeal to a younger audience, Kimono told the Punch in an interview: “I have been playing reggae music for years and I don’t plan to change my style or dilute it. Those who want to listen will surely do. The truth is that you can force a horse to the river, but you can’t force it to drink from it. We still have a lot of youths who know my value. I don’t believe that all the youths are senseless.

“I believe two million youths out of five million youths know the difference between good and bad. If I had changed my style, I would probably not be here talking to you. I am certain the media would have crucified me that I did it for the love of money. My brand of music has kept me alive and still makes me relevant.”

The album didn’t have much impact. He, however, says it was because they weren’t accompanied with music videos. “I plan to shoot videos this year. Though people think CDs don’t sell again, I belong to the school of thought that believes that CDs must sell. The Internet is still not available to everyone in the country, especially for people in the North. Many people in the rural areas still prefer buying CDs,” he said.